Naree
In the Studio Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Narre back in the Studio working on two new tracks.
Stay tuned.

Naree Graduates Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Berklee College of Music, Bachelors of Music in
Songwriting: December 2010

Guildfest 2010 Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Naree and band performs main stage at Guildfest
music festival in the UK

2010 Naree the Soundtrack Vol 1 Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Bussy year for Naree 2nd Album released
in 2010

2010 Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Naree new album Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.
Full 11 track album released.

2009 DIY Records Posted: Sep 2, 2011


Naree's track "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
featured on DIY Records Demo CD

Finally here the Album Posted: Oct 28, 2007


Naree's latest 6 Track Album a masterpiece must have
Album Moving and emotional, part of the income of
the Album will go to Naree's "Pick Life" in support of
the Teen Cancer Trust.
www.teenagecancertrust.org


AllBiz Music Showcase 12 Oct Posted: Sep 2, 2007


Naree
October, 12 2007 at AllBiz Music Showcase @ CBR'S
http://www.allbizeg.com/, Columbus, Ohio
See Naree and her entire band play live infront of A&R
people and Record Scouts.
Tickets are only $10 and there will be other bands.

Opening For Pink in Dubai Posted: Sep 2, 2007


Naree

September, 5 2007 at Opening For Pink! Dubai!
Not Available , Dubai, na
Cost : AED 170.00 - 600.00

The Middle East is getting a shot of Hard Rock irreverence with the
announcement of P!nk as the Dubai Ambassadors of Rock act. The
rock princess will perform at the Dubai Media City Amphitheatre on
September 5th as part of Hard Rock's Ambassadors of Rock Tour.
Narre will open the Show


NAREE IN NORTH YORK MIRROR! Posted: Jun 15, 2006


Bout with cancer inspires survivor's recording
career Compared to Avril Lavigne, teen will sing
at Relay for Life





Naree's Featured Artisit 3 times on GarageBand.com Posted: May 16, 2006


Due to some really good reveiws on garageband.com,
Naree managed to achieve being a Featured Artist with
3 of her songs. First one was "Proud" off of her second
album, "Proud" being the title track. Second was the
romantic ballad "In Arms" as the acoustic edition and
the latest was "This Girl" based on Naree's first
experience with the music industry. You can hear all
these tracks at www.garageband.com/naree and even
read reveiws on what other musicians had to say
about it!

Naree Signs with PROTRX Posted: May 16, 2006


I just wanted to make a quick announcement that I have
signed a contract today with Protrx © and would like to
introduce Christopher Blueman as a new member
of the Naree team. C. Blueman is now
my official AR. YAY! *Clapping*.


Naree Performs at the Terry Fox Run in Abu Dhabi Posted: Mar 4, 2006


EXTRA EXTRA READ ALL ABOUT IT, NAREE IN ACTION!
Naree is back in fighting form
By Rania Habib, Staff Reporter
Naree will perform at the Terry Fox run in Abu Dhabi.


Newspaper article Posted: Mar 4, 2006


An interview with Naree in the Emirates Today newspaper on her views about the music industry in the U.A.E!

You can check out the link to read the whole story:

http://213.132.44.184/emiratestoday/Default.aspx?selpg=172

"JAMMING AWAY WITH NO SIGN OF A CONTRACT"

Written by Christopher Sweeney

The music industry attracts its fair share of hopefuls looking for their “one-in-a-mil lion” break to superstardom. But despite all its wellstocked music stores, pop radio stations and magazines predicting the next big thing, is the UAE a good place for an English-language artist to clinch a record deal?
Singer and guitarist Rebecca Londei is finding out that launching a music career in the Emirates is an uphill struggle.The 18-yearold, born and raised in Abu Dhabi, sings soft rock tunes under the name Naree and has been waiting for a break since carving out her first album I’m No Fool in Wales four years ago.

Initially, the only studio she could find in the Emirates to lay down more tracks was fitted with ageing equipment, reminiscent of that in the recently-released Johnny Cash biopic, she jokes.

“It was like something from the movie Walk The Line,” says the half-British, half-Thai artist. “You have the reel going round – and that’s analogue, so you’d have to do it over and over again until you get it right.” With no usable studio, Londei says she decided to go shopping, adding: “We’ve got the basic necessities for a reasonable recording at home: microphones, monitors, a mixer, the computer programme. My dad had to use the programme even though he is not a musician.” She kept on laying down tracks there and, upon discovering Dubai’s Rafbani Studios, flew in producer Chris Tew from Wales to work with her “simply because there is no one here to do it”, she says.

Recently, the International Music Institute in Abu Dhabi opened a recording studio where Londei produced her second album Proud and is busy working on a third.

Despite churning out hours and hours of music, Londei remains dissatisfied with the UAE’s music industry, saying people assume, “if you’re a local artist in the UAE, you couldn’t possibly be any good”.

“That’s the way I think agencies and radio stations look at you,” she explains. “Like if you’re good, then why are you here in the UAE?” The teen wannabe’s father, Ronald, doubles as her manager, studio engineer, website designer (www.nareemusic.com) and even assembles promotional packs of CDs and artist information.

The businessman says he feels let down by the music industry in the UAE, claiming: “The attitude is pathetic.They will not play you here – they treat you like a fool. Local agents don’t even bother to return your call, it’s embarrassing.” LIMITED AIRPLAY Despite promotional packs landing on the desks of disc jockeys at various stations, Londei’s tunes have only received airplay from DJ Fadi, the breakfast show host on Emirates Radio 2.

The angry dad says he resents the “closed-door mentality” of record label employees who refuse to reveal their firm’s address or e-mail.

Downcast by her lack of commercial success, Londei says: “It makes me feel stupid as I’m very conscious of what people think of me, so when I call someone once I don’t want to be pushy.” At the other end of the industry, Mathew Johnson, programme director for Dubai Eye 103.8 at the Arabian Radio Network, says the station is a supporter of the local community, and that Dubai is a “fantastic place to foster growth of music with cross-cultural influence”.

“Dubai Eye strongly supports local talent and offers more coverage than any other for artists and groups looking to break into the market and gain awareness of their music, not only in English but in any one of the eight languages we broadcast in,” explains Johnson.

“Our sister radio stations, which include Dubai 92, the Asian radio station City 101.6 or Al Arabiya 98.9, are also strong supporters of locally developed talent and – as long as it fits within the music policy – the station will include such music in its playlist,” he continues.

“My advice to groups wishing to establish themselves in the UAE is not just to approach any radio station randomly, but to understand their target market and look to develop an ongoing relationship with the music director of the radio station where a similar genre of music is played.” LOCAL SIGNINGS Rachel Monk, the international promotions manager for EMI here, says the global record label would consider signing a UAE artist “if the opportunity presented itself” adding she would “not necessarily” be looking for an Emirati performer.

She says that she considers a country such as Egypt more likely to produce an example of “regional talent”.

Monk’s firm has already signed a number of local UAE artists – but only for traditional Arabic music genres. “We always welcome talent out there to send [samples] to us,” she says. “We may be able to offer some good industry advice and constructive feedback.” However, Londei remains sceptical about the “open door” policy for budding musicians presented by Monk, adding: “I’ve spoken to other local bands and they say the same thing.” A quick search through the internet reveals the teen performer is not alone in her quest for musical fame. A total of 23 UAE acts feature among almost 166,000 independent artists on the website www.garageband.com who are angling to have their music played and reviewed by downloaders.

Two further UAE-based musicians had recorded several albums worth of material on the www.broadjam.com site.

Discussing the UAE’s talent pool, lecturer Ali Sultan from the Dubai branch of School of Audio Engineering acknowledges that a true musical culture has yet to develop in the Emirates.

“I think part of the problem is that you have all these clubs… that always play cheesy music – there is no real themed music,” he says. “I think the people have no inspiration.There are no production studios here.

“What is needed is for people who like types of music… to gather where they have the chance to communicate, where you have local bands playing, who inspire each other.” Londei has spent almost five years trying to establish herself on an Abu Dhabi circuit that does not seem to exist – only landing one regular slot at the Starbucks café on Hamdan Street where she has managed to strike a chord with an Arab crowd.

“They don’t tell you no, they just say: ‘We’ll get back to you.’ And they walk away,” she says. “You give them the CD and they probably just throw it in the bin or don’t even listen to it. That’s the feeling I get anyway.” R&B maestro Karl Wolf is a rare animal indeed – an artist bred in the UAE who landed a contract with a mainstream label, Universal. The Lebanese musician now lives in Montreal, Canada, after spending 14 formative years developing his musical skills in the Emirates.

Wolf shot to fame after writing tunes for the top-selling Frenchlanguage Pop Idol 2003 compilation album. His recent debut album Face Behind The Face has garnered rave reviews from critics and fans.

“I definitely think that I wouldn’t have had the chance in Dubai as much as I have done here in North America with my music,” he says. “Dubai is getting there as a world-renowned cosmopolitan city with huge business capabilities, but it is still behind in many industries, especially entertainment.” Londei, her musician buddies, and even Wolf seem to share the view that UAE-based record labels, radio stations, promoters and venues are not that interested in helping homegrown talent.

So, the final answer as to whether musical wannabees have got a chance to make it big in the pop business is: maybe – but it will not be easy.


Video Posted: Aug 15, 2005


Video for the song Superhero Made at Sonalysts
Studio CT USA.
See in Video section


Garageband.com Posted: Sep 11, 2005


Track of the Day http://www.GarageBand.com/go/BIL060SC9O